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Learning Framework


Student Learning Process

Prepare: To be successful, preparation is key. Before class, study the course material and develop a solid understanding of it. Try to construct an understanding of the big picture and how each of the ideas and concepts relate to each other. Where appropriate use study groups to improve yours and others understanding of the material.

Engage: When attending class actively participate in discussions and ask questions. Test your ideas out with others and be open to their ideas and insights as well. As you leave class ask yourself, "Was class better because I was there today?"

Improve: Reflect on learning experiences and allow them to shape you into a more complete person; be willing to change your position or perspective on a certain subject. Take new risks and seek further opportunities to learn.

 

 

 

 

Characteristics of a Disciple Learner

Faithful

As a faithful learner, you are motivated by your love for God. You wish to serve the Lord and build his kingdom. You actively seek for greater light and knowledge through the Holy Ghost with a commitment to be obedient to that learning. As a faithful learner, you place the word of God above the wisdom of the world (2 Nephi 9:28-29).

Prepare: You “seek learning, even by study and also by faith” (DC 88:118). Your faith and obedience will invite the Holy Ghost to expand your learning capacity.

Engage: As you interact with your teacher and other students in an attitude of faith, all will be “edified and rejoice together” (D&C 50:22).

Improve:  You ask God, in faith, to help you improve. As a result, the Holy Ghost will “teach [you] all things which are expedient for [you]” (D&C 74:10).

Hopeful

As a hopeful learner, you have confidence in God’s ability and willingness to help you improve. You know that you are not limited in your capacity to learn and have faith that through Him all things are possible. You approach learning with confidence, optimism, and enthusiasm, knowing that all will work together for your good (Heb. 11:1).

Prepare:  You do not get discouraged when you do not understand the material well because you see your preparation in proper perspective. You seek God’s help, knowing that he will help you succeed.

Engage: You engage with others with enthusiasm and optimism for what you are learning. You believe that interaction with others will help everyone grow and learn.

Improve:  You know that the Lord is helping you improve through your experiences. When discouragement comes, you are quick to ask God to bless you with a greater learning capacity.

Charitable

As a charitable learner, you seek to use learning to bless the lives of others. You see others as God’s children and feel concern for their happiness and success. You are patient with your own and others’ imperfections and rejoice in their success as much as your own (Moroni 7:45).

Prepare: You seek ways to help others prepare successfully.

Engage: You are patient and kind in your interactions with others. You readily share what you are learning.

Improve:  You sincerely rejoice when you and others improve.

Diligent

As a diligent learner, you are active in the learning process, take responsibility for your own learning, and do many good things of your own free will (DC 58:27). You do not passively wait for others to teach you, but are anxiously engaged in understanding truth. As a result, you find great joy and satisfaction in learning (Alma 32:41-43).

Prepare: You make plans to prepare effectively, avoid distractions, and work hard to completely understand the material.

Engage: Your participation in class is an important part of your learning and leadership development at BYU—Hawaii. You actively share and teach others what you have learned.

Improve:  You consistently revise your study habits to increase your capacity to learn, including: planning effectively, reading with comprehension, organizing key concepts, and reviewing materials systematically.

Reflective

As a reflective learner, you regularly make time to ponder and assess your learning (D&C 9:8-9). As you reflect you consider feedback from your teacher, peers, and your own impressions.

Prepare: Before class you mentally construct and connect the ideas and concepts you are studying. You incorporate prior feedback into your preparation.

Engage: You listen to the comments of others and seriously consider their perspectives. You also consider your own biases and seek to make righteous judgments.  

Improve:  As you consider feedback from teachers and fellow students, you evaluate your performance. As you ponder, you will open your mind to inspiration from the Holy Ghost on how to improve.

Humble

As a humble learner, you recognize your need to learn and are open to change how you think, feel, and act. You do not place yourself in opposition to God or other people, but seek to learn from them. You accept feedback with meekness, grateful for your opportunity to learn.

Prepare: You approach the course materials with an open mind, willing to explore new perspectives.

Engage: You interact with others and avoid a spirit of competition. You sincerely listen to the perspectives of others.

Improve:  You do not selfishly claim credit for your accomplishments. Instead, you seek to give credit to God and others for their role in your work. You do not avoid areas of weakness, but seek to make them your strengths.

Honest

As an honest learner, you are always truthful about your work and the work of others.

Prepare: You complete your assignments and accurately report your work.

Engage:You work hard to fulfill your commitments. You never claim the work of others as your own.

Improve:  You accurately evaluate your learning abilities by truthfully recognizing your strengths and weaknesses.

The Teaching Process

Prepare: To be successful, thoughtfully consider student capabilities and development needs, identify appropriate learning goals, plan associated assessment techniques, and design learning activities that will help your students develop in the content area and as learners. When designing course activities, ensure that students have opportunities to prepare effectively, engage productively, and improve in their learning capacity.

Engage: During class, create an environment of love and respect, where each student “may have an equal privilege” (D&C 88:122). Actively encourage student participation through thought-provoking questions, whole-class and small-group discussion, and other learning activities. Take time outside of class to individually help your students. Remember, effective “teaching is not talking and telling. Teaching is observing and listening so that we can discern, and then know what to say.”[1]

Improve: Regularly reflect on your experiences and use them to improve your teaching. Actively seek input and ideas from your students and colleagues. Consistently change what you do to better serve the students you teach.

Characteristics of a Disciple Teacher

Faithful

As a faithful teacher, you are motivated by your love for God. You wish to serve the Lord and build his kingdom. You actively seek for greater light and knowledge through the Holy Ghost with a commitment to be obedient to that learning. As a faithful teacher, you place the word of God above the wisdom of the world (2 Nephi 9:28-29).

Prepare: You prepare spiritually. In your daily life, you strive to live the gospel. You pray for your students, seeking the Lord’s help as you guide them. You also are an active learner and “seek learning, even by study and also by faith” (DC 88:118). Your faith and obedience will invite the Holy Ghost to expand your learning and teaching capacity.

Engage: You begin class with prayer, inviting the Holy Ghost to guide your time together. You interact with your students in an attitude of faith, believing that as you engage together, all will be “edified and rejoice together” (D&C 50:22).

Improve:  You ask God, in faith, to help you improve. As a result, the Holy Ghost will “teach [you] all things which are expedient for [you]” (D&C 74:10).

Hopeful

As a hopeful teacher, you have confidence in God’s ability and willingness to help you reach your students. You know that you are not limited in your capacity to touch others and have faith that through Him all things are possible. You also know that your students are not limited in their capacity to learn. You approach teaching with confidence, optimism, and enthusiasm, knowing that all will work together for your good and the good of your students (Heb. 11:1).

Prepare: You prepare with a vision of what your students can become.

Engage: You invite student participation believing that student contributions are valuable to the learning process.

Improve:  You have an assurance that you and your students can improve and have great faith that they can achieve their eternal potential.

Charitable

As a charitable teacher, you seek to bless the lives of others. You see your students as God’s children and feel concern for their happiness and success. You are patient with your students’ imperfections and rejoice in their success (Moroni 7:45).

Prepare: You prepare for class with your students in mind, truly concerned for their welfare. You are willing to help colleagues in their preparation.

Engage: You are patient and kind in your interactions with your students and colleagues. You look for ways to serve outside of your normal responsibilities.

Improve:  You sincerely rejoice when you and others improve.

Diligent

As a diligent teacher, you are active in the teaching and learning process, take responsibility for your own teaching and learning, and do many good things of your own free will (DC 58:27). You ensure that all students are engaged in the learning process and seek after the students who are not succeeding. As a result, you find great joy and satisfaction in your students’ learning and growth (Alma 32:41-43).

Prepare: You are consistent, earnest, and energetic in your preparation.

Engage: You take every opportunity to engage with students inside and outside of class.

Improve:  You work hard to improve your teaching practices to meet the needs of your students. You take advantage of opportunities to help students improve how they learn. 

knowing that the Lord can you help you know what to do and say to help others.

Reflective

As a reflective teacher, you regularly make time to ponder and assess your teaching (D&C 9:8-9). As you reflect, you consider feedback from your students, colleagues, and your own impressions.

Prepare: As you prepare you ponder on the principles that will bless the lives of your students. You actively seek truth through study and faith.

Engage: As you engage with students and other colleagues you sincerely reflect on their perspectives, knowing that the Lord can you help you know what to do and say to help others.

Improve:  You consistently reflect on your teaching, seeking inspiration on ways to improve.

Humble

As a humble learner, you recognize your need to learn and are open to change how you think, feel, and act. You do not place yourself in opposition to God or other people, but seek to learn from them. You accept feedback with meekness, grateful for your opportunity to learn.

Prepare: You approach the course materials with an open mind, willing to explore new perspectives.

Engage: You interact with others and avoid a spirit of competition. You sincerely listen to the perspectives of others.

Improve:  You do not selfishly claim credit for your accomplishments. Instead, you seek to give credit to God and others for their role in your work. You do not avoid areas of weakness, but seek to make them your strengths.

Honest

As an honest teacher, you are always truthful about your work and the work of others. You understand that you have a contractual relationship with the university that is coupled with a covenant relationship with the Lord. 

Prepare: You put in the time necessary to prepare effectively.

Engage: You seek to be an example of devotion, dependability, and integrity to others at the university and in the community.

Improve:  You accurately evaluate your teaching abilities by truthfully recognizing your strengths and weaknesses.

 

 

 


[1] From “A Discussion with Elder Bednar”, August 2, 2011.